Health

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Udall: Problems with Gardner's birth control plan

Democratic Sen. Mark Udall expressed skepticism Friday about his challenger's proposal to allow birth control pills to be sold without a prescription, as contraception issues continued to dominate the competitive contest. Udall made the remarks in response to a question at a news conference to highlight his latest foray into ...

FDA weighs cancer risk of fibroid removal devices

Federal health advisers say there is little to no evidence that a popular technique for removing fibroids can be performed without the risk of spreading undetected cancers to other parts of the body. The panel of Food and Drug Administration experts also said Friday that women who do undergo the ...

911 tapes depict response to collapse of vet

Newly released emergency dispatch tapes reveal further details about efforts to revive a Vietnam veteran who collapsed with a heart attack in a Veterans Affairs hospital in Albuquerque. Two calls were made while 71-year-old Jim Napoleon Garcia lay on the floor as an ambulance was called to take him to ...

FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2013, file photo, a sign marks the entrance to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,in Atlanta.   Citing an anthrax scare and a recurring problem with safety, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday, July 11, 2014,  shut down two research labs and stopped shipping highly dangerous germs to other labs. One of the closed facilities was involved an incident last month that could have accidentally exposed workers in three labs to anthrax. A second, previously undisclosed problem earlier this year involved deadly bird flu. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Anthrax scare reveals more CDC lab safety problems

Citing an anthrax scare and other safety problems, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday said it shut down two research labs and stopped shipping highly dangerous germs to other labs. An incident at one of the closed Atlanta labs could have accidentally exposed workers in three labs ...

Kansas records death from rare infection

Kansas health officials say a person from the Kansas City area has died of a rare infection caused by an amoeba that lives in freshwater lakes and rivers. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment said Friday it's only the state's second known case of a person contracting primary amoebic ...

Lawmakers seek lower price for bill on vets' care

Stung by sticker shock, members of Congress are scrambling to lower the cost of a bill to fix veterans' health care amid a growing uproar over long waits for appointments and falsification of records to cover up the delays at Veterans Affairs hospitals. At the same time, deficit hawks fear ...

Cholera threatens thousands in South Sudan: agency

An outbreak of cholera is putting thousands of lives at risk in parts of South Sudan, worsening the country's humanitarian crisis amid ongoing violence, the aid group Save the Children said Friday. The disease has infected more than 2,600 people and killed at least 60 since the first cases were ...

FILE - In this file photo taken Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, a Pakistani child suffering from the mosquito-borne disease, dengue fever, lies in a bed, next to his mother, covered with a net at an isolation ward of a hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The most advanced vaccine for dengue only offers modest protection but could still help millions of people avoid the devastating effects of the disease known as “breakbone fever,” according to a large trial. There is no treatment or vaccine for dengue, which causes symptoms including fever, severe joint pain, headaches and bleeding. About half the world’s population is at risk from the mosquito-borne disease, which sickens about 100 million people every year, mostly in Asia, Africa and Latin America. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen, File)

Trial: dengue shot offers some protection

The most advanced vaccine for dengue only offers modest protection but could still help millions of people avoid the devastating effects of the disease known as "breakbone fever," according to a large trial. There is no treatment for dengue, which causes symptoms including fever, severe joint pain, headaches and bleeding. ...

FILE - In this March 5, 2014 file photo, Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Calif., poses for a photo at an AIDS conference in Boston. Dr. Deveikis was involved in the treatment of a baby born with the AIDS virus. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that the Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi, File)

Girl hoped to have been cured of HIV has relapsed

A Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus and in remission for more than two years despite stopping treatment now shows signs that she still harbors HIV — and therefore is not cured. The news is a setback to hopes that very early treatment with powerful HIV drugs might reverse ...

Compounding pharmacy oversight changes signed

Two years after a deadly nationwide meningitis outbreak linked to a compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts, Gov. Deval Patrick on Thursday signed a law he said would address a "gray area" between state and federal oversight of the pharmacies. The measure includes new licensing and labeling requirements and steps up fines ...

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